Brief history

 

 

Between the wars

References to the North Irish Horse in newspapers and from other sources between 1919 and 1939.

 

1919

This notice, appearing in the Belfast News-Letter of 8 October 1919, advertised the sale by auction of the buildings and other items that had made up the North Irish Horse reserve camp at Antrim from very early in the war until July 1919.

G.R.
MINISTRY OF MUNITIONS.
BY DIRECTION OF THE DISPOSAL BOARD
(HUTS AND BUILDING MATERIALS SECTION).
SALE BY AUCTION
OF
16 WOODEN HUTS

OFFICES, MESS HUTS, AND KITCHENS, DINING ROOMS, STORES, BATH HOUSES, STABLES, FORAGE SHEDS, PUMP, WATER TROUGHS, HORSEFALL, DESTRUCTOR, LATRINES, ABLUTIONS, &C.,

AT ANTRIM CAMP, CO. ANTRIM,
On THURSDAY, 9th October, 1919, AT 11.30 o'clock.
The Sale will comprise:–

16 WOODEN LIVING HUTS.
OFFICE AND VERANDAH.
SERGEANTS' MESS AND KITCHEN.
MESS ROOMS.
COOK HOUSE.
WASH UPS.
BATH HOUSES.
DRYING ROOM.
ABLUTIONS.
LATRINES AND ENCLOSURES.
STABLES.
FORAGE SHEDS.
PUMP.
840 FEET PIPING.
WATER TROUGHS.

Catalogues can be obtained from the Auctioneer, JAMES KING, 25, Chichester Street, Belfast.

NOTE. –"SURPLUS," price 3d, the Official List of Government Property for Sale; published twice monthly. On sale everywhere.

NOTE.

A MOTOR CHAR-A-BANC will LEAVE the CITY HALL at 9-30 for ANTRIM, and will RETURN to BELFAST immediately after the Sale is Concluded. Bookings per (..?..), at THOMPSON'S GARAGE, Victoria Square. RETURN FARE, 10s.

 

1938

NORTH IRISH HORSE
First of Reserves to Get Into Touch With Germans

The North Irish Horse was the first reserve regiment to gain touch with the Germans in August, 1914. This is made clear by the following letter from Major Sir Ronald Ross, M.C., in the current issue of "The Field."

"Sir – I have read with great interest the letter from Colonel Burns-Lindow, who commanded that fine squadron which so worthily represented the South Irish Horse in August, 1914, with the B.E.F., as to who would claim to be the first reserve unit 'to gain touch with' the Germans in 1914.

"Certainly the squadron of the N.I.H. under Lord Cole (as he then was) was intended for General Headquarters, whereas the squadron of the sister regiment went to 1st Corps Headquarters, both positions of reasonable security under the conditions of 1914. But if reference is made to the official history – 'Military Operations France and Belgium, 1914,' Vol. 1, at page 148 (footnote) – it will be seen that half the N.I.H. squadron were detached to act as divisional cavalry to the 4th Infantry Division. That half squadron left G.H.Q. on the evening of 24th August, and patrols sent out to gain touch with the 19th Infantry Brigade were under shell fire shortly after noon on the 25th north of Solesmes.

"The half squadron opened fire with their rifles for the first time that evening in a skirmish with a Uhlan patrol east of a village of Broillers, some hours before the action of Landrecies, in which their comrades of the South took part after dark.

"I had always understood that the S.I.H. Squadron had remained with 1st Corps Headquarters till the evening of 25th August, and that Landrecies was their first action.

"I think that probably if you test the matter by which regiment was (a) first shot at, or (b) first to shoot, or even (c) first to suffer a battle casualty, the North Irish Horse would be found to be first.

"It is, however, a somewhat academic question, and the two squadrons came out in the same ship, and their landing and joining up with the B.E.F. was a dead-heat. If, therefore, the honour is shared between the two regiments, now, alas! regiments no more, no one who served in the North Irish Horse would, I am sure, grudge such a division with their old friends and comrades of the South."

(Belfast News-Letter, 23 August 1938)